On Repeat: “The Diamond” My Brightest Diamond

https://i1.wp.com/www.onetunes.ru/wp-content/uploads/r/1489926/6.jpgI was listening to NPR’s All Songs Considered today, and they described Bjork’s music as “celestial.” I think there are many moments that My Brightest Diamond does the same thing, even if not in such a grandiose way, on this album.

I think a lot of that celestial feeling in My Brightest Diamond comes from the delicate weaving of strings, harp, moody piano bass, and breathy background vocalisations.  And *that* is exactly what I find so enchanting about this body of work. It is graceful and violent. But! I am not here to talk about the album as a whole, but just the beautifully bitter “The Diamond;” which incidentally is my very first MBD song. *sigh*

I can tell you first off that what drew me into the murky and lovely universe of “The Diamond” is Shara Nova’s dark tinted, breathy delivery. She also is very talented at giving stony, sharp reproaches–which you can hear in this song’s lines “are you coming?” and “you must feel splendid.”

I really love the drums in this track, which are muted and almost sound canned. There is also a very light guitar tremolo in parts that remind me of the slight tremble in a tense voice. It’s one of those parts that is easy to miss, but would completely change the texture of the song if it weren’t there. Also, Maeve Gilchrist on harp is just phenomenal. Her part starts out slow and spaced, but builds into the verses in such a way that you feel like you are being carried away on a wave. It is perfect and in my opinion, is what makes this track sparkle.

Honest to stars, if you’ve never listened to My Brightest Diamond’s “A Thousand Shark’s Teeth,” please please give it a whirl. You’ll need a quiet time, some candles and possibly some wine or maybe a toasty cup of coffee and a cloudy day, but it is well worth giving it the space to breath it’s beauty into your life.

5/5

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On Repeat: “The Diamond” My Brightest Diamond

New to the Library: “Year of the Monkey” Osso & Sufjan Stevens; arr. Michael Atkinson

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/90/Run_Rabbit_Run_cover.jpg/220px-Run_Rabbit_Run_cover.jpgI got this track to add to a mix cd for my mom, a year-of-the-monkey herself. I’m not sure that I love it, but it -is- good.

It is stark and bewildering. In many ways, a complete contrast to their “Year of the Dragon” (me : D). Although it begins bright and a bit shy, most of the track is filled with dissonant chords, phrases that start and stop, and seemingly none on repeat. This finally works its way into a huge swelling bridge that overwhelms the senses. It then takes a huge gasp for breath and pushes harder into the swirl of discomfort. After which, the bridge promptly breaks down into jangling that is even more disorienting than the beginning of the song. It is very much the kind of compositional arch you might find in a running-confused-through-the-forest type film scene.

Overall, I find it quite beautiful in a jabbing, dangerous sort of way. Definitely worth a taste.

3.5/5

New to the Library: “Year of the Monkey” Osso & Sufjan Stevens; arr. Michael Atkinson